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Dynamic Landing Page Content – Beware

There has been a lot of hype surrounding dynamic keyword matching for paid search advertising for both ads and landing pages. Though this is a popular tool, we urge you to think twice. If not executed to a tee, it can have an unfavorable effect on your quality score, especially for landing pages.

Why is quality score important? The simplest explanation is that the worse your Quality Score (or the worse Google judges the quality of your content), the more you pay per click. Having a quality score of 9 or 10 can save you as much as 50% on each click.

Dynamic content has been around for a while, so why are we just now writing about it? An Unbounce email we received on Wednesday made our jaws drop:

To reiterate: “You can use a single landing page for all of your ads, saving you a ton of time.”

Sure, it might save you time, but it sure as heck isn’t saving you money.

When you really think about populating your landing page content, let alone a single landing page, with interchangeable keywords, it doesn’t make sense strategically. There are two primary shortfalls:

 

Content Writing

To avoid awkward wording when keywords are interchanged, it forces you to write broader static content. This all translates directly to a lower Quality Score and makes it harder to customize aspects of the landing page like the call-to-action.

Google is a business. It only wants to show ads that it thinks will get clicked, in other words what it finds relevant to the query. People are searching for specific answers to their questions/problems. So the broader your static landing page content, the less relevant (and consequently visible) it will be despite what is dynamic. Content not relevant to the searcher means that you are paying Google for clicks that won’t convert.

 

Google Bots

Another disadvantage: dynamic content is usually based on AJAX and Java. Both of these are invisible to Google bots the majority of the time. In addition, dynamic HTML needs cookies & session IDs in the base code, which often causes Google bots to leave your website immediately.

Dynamic keyword matching for your landing pages might be tempting at first glance, no doubt about it. But using one landing page for all of your paid search ads forces you to pay for clicks that won’t convert, and ultimately you’ll be investing money into a campaign that doesn’t perform optimally. Where’s the ROI in that?

We’ve helped a number of clients succeed with paid search campaigns. If your business is considering taking on paid search advertising or you just simply have questions, shoot us an email at engage@methodsavvy.com. Happy to point you in the right direction.

 

Posted in General, Marketing, Pay Per Click, SEO Tagged with: , ,
  • Jamie Griffiths

    “Another disadvantage: dynamic content is usually based on AJAX and Java. Both of these are invisible to Google bots the majority of the time. In addition, dynamic HTML needs cookies & session IDs in the base code, which often causes Google bots to leave your website immediately.”

    I don’t mean to sound rude, but whoever wrote this doesn’t know what they are talking about. Dynamically inserting keywords from URL parameters doesn’t require AJAX or Java (I think you meant Javascript, but it doesn’t require that either). It doesn’t require cookies or session IDs either.

    All of these things can be necessary for ‘dynamic HTML’, but this is wholly unrelated to dynamically inserting keywords into the text on a page from URL parameters. Dynamic keyword insertion can be done wholly by server side code prior to page rendering (so, PHP if you use WordPress for example).